Physical Dreamscape International

tferebnu:

steampunktendencies:

The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken (DutchKoninklijke Serres van LakenFrenchSerres Royales de Laeken), are a vast complex of monumental heated greenhouses in the park of the Royal Palace of Laeken in the north of Brussels. It is one of the major tourist attractions of the city.

The complex was commissioned by King Leopold II and designed by Alphonse Balat. Built between 1874 and 1895, the complex was finished with the completion of the so-called “Iron Church”, a domed greenhouse that would originally serve as the royal chapel. The total floor surface of this immense complex is 2.5 hectares (270,000 square feet). 800,000 liters (over 200,000 US gallons) of fuel oil are needed each year to heat the buildings.

The complex can only be visited during a two-week period in April–May each year, when most flowers are in full bloom.

Credits : [Wikipedia] [Olivier Polet] [Luc Viatour]

Those tree ferns are doing serious things to me.

asylum-art:

Floto+Warner Studio: Colorful Liquid Splashes Captured at 1/3500th of a Second Look Like Floating Sculpturest 

Cassandra Warner and Jeremy Floto of Floto+Warner Studio recently produced this beautiful series of photos titled Clourant that seemingly turns large splashes of colorful liquid into glistening sculptures that hover in midair.  The photos were shot at a speed of 1/3,500th of a second, taking special care to disguise the origin of each burst making images appear almost digital in nature (the duo assures no Photoshop was used).

(via tallbrownnutter)

lossinthewilderness:

A woman lives in a tiny bohemian house with a botanical garden of her own!

Source:
http://frommoontomoon.blogspot.com.au/2013/10/the-botanical-home-of-musician-mileece.html

(via wonderingalex)

rollership:

From Curbed.com 

(via fajita)

therhumboogie:

By Olafur Eliasson, this breathtaking installation at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art of a river running through the museum is astounding. It is such a realistic, natural landscape the museum could have been dropped on top of the river itself for how pristine it looks. This site-specific installation is a focus on experience, and how the viewer senses their surroundings. 

(Source: designboom.com, via randomc)

7knotwind:

User 632 is an installation that stores the behavior of the people who look at it by monitoring them in return. It wants to know when and how a person passes by or if they stop on the way.

All data is being tracked and displayed publicly. Passers-by are stored as an anonymous number without any hints to their identities. Whoever comes to close to the camera though will be stored with a photograph next to their id.

The installation is made up of three Kinect depth cameras that constantly look for movements which are then reduced to a simple directional line in space. When a visitor enters a specific area, the algorithm is looking for a face. As soon as one is found a countdown appears that shows the time until a photo is taken automatically. At the same time the time a user is in the visible area is stored.

This data (time, path and eventually image) are stored in a database, interpreted and displayed as real-time statistics.

Link

archatlas:

Design, 3D & Animation Thiago Lima

(via thetreewhocouldnotdoalotofthings)